Rose Part 2: Modern Garden Roses

In 1867 Jean-Baptiste Guillot developed a rose, ‘La France’, when he crossed a Tea Rose with a Hybrid Perpetual. This plant known as the Hybrid Tea rose began the age of the Modern Garden Rose.

Most plants in this class are repeat-bloomers with rich and vibrant colours but do not adapt well in cold climates and are very susceptible to disease and pests. Modern Garden Roses are also further classified into several groups.

Hybrid Tea Roses

This flower with its single long stemmed bloom available in every colour but blue and black is the standard rose used in the floral industry.?á Because of intense inbreeding to create a flower with perfect form many Hybrid Tea’s no longer have a scent or the disease resistance and hardiness of its ancestors.

'Die Welt'

'Die Welt'

 

'Lady Aberdeen'

'Lady Aberdeen'

 

 

 

 

 

  

    

Floribunda Roses

This rose was created with the desire to a have a more compact, hardy and disease resistant plant. Floribundas have the look of Hybrid Tea Roses but blooms prolifically from summer to fall.

'Atlantic Star'

'Atlantic Star'

 

'Macivy'

'Macivy'

 

   

    

    

 

  

       

    

Grandiflora Roses

Crossed between the Hybrid Tea and Floribundas, the flowers of these roses are larger and cluster on top of taller stems usually as a double bloom.

Old Garden and Modern Garden Roses make up the majority of plants in the home rose garden. They can be further classified by colour, size, blooming characteristics, scent or growth habits but the categories I’ve described are the standard for the American Rose Society making it easier for the average gardener to keep them straight. Here are a couple more types of roses that you may see in landscaping.

Miniature Roses

'Pink Bells'

'Pink Bells'

All of the classes of Old Garden Roses have miniature versions. They range from 3″ to 18″ tall with continuous, scentless blooms in every colour available. Most miniatures are marketed as houseplants but will do quite well in outside containers, in rock gardens or as border.

 

   

'William Baffin'

'William Baffin'

   

Climbing Roses

All roses have ‘climbing’ forms where stems grow longer and more flexible than the bush forms. With Modern Roses this is usually due to a mutation while it is a natural growth habit of many varieties of Old Roses. Climbing roses are repeat bloomers and can grow anywhere from 8′ to 20′ in height. However these plants are not considered vines because of their inability to cling to support themselves. Instead they must be trained and tied to structures like trellises and pergolas.

Shrub Roses

Shrub Roses, also know as Landscape Roses, were created from the demand by gardeners who prefer roses that offer the colour, fragrance and form of Modern and Old Garden Roses but are low maintenance and easy to care for. These roses have good disease and pest resistance, a lower growth habit and continuous blooming making them a great choice for mass plantings.

'Applejack'

'Applejack'

 

'Prairie Princess'

'Prairie Princess'

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

With all the choices of roses out there gardeners will have no problems picking out the plants that have the best characteristics for them and still create a gorgeous visual display.

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