Roses Part 1: Old Garden Roses

Any rose that has been recognized before 1867 is considered an Old Garden Rose. Native to Europe and Asia they are generally pastel in colour and most varieties only bloom once per year usually representing the arrival of summer. Yet because of their long history, their resistance to pests and disease and their ability to adapt in poor weather conditions, they have been considered the most versatile of all the roses.  Due to crossbreeding of specimens from Europe and Asia, Old Garden Roses are further classified in one of the following groups.

'Tuscany'

'Tuscany'

Gallica Roses

One of the finest, these roses have a long lasting show of red, pink or purple blooms with a very intense fragrance. The plants have attractive dark green foliage and stems with few thorns.

'Mme. Hardy'

'Mme. Hardy'

 

 

Damask Roses

Summer Damasks will only flower once in the summer while the Autumn Damasks are the only Old Garden Rose that will produce a second flowering in the fall. These plants develop fragrant flowers in white, pink or red.

'Prolifera de Redoute'

'Prolifera de Redoute'

 

Centifolia or Province Roses

Also known as ‘cabbage roses’, these one hundred petaled flowers came from the Dutch and can be seen in much of their earlier artwork. Being the most fragrant of all the roses they are still cultivated today for their perfume.

'Blanche Moreau'

'Blanche Moreau'

 

 

Moss Roses

Named for the mossy growth on their flower stems, sepals and buds, these roses are just a mutation of the Centifolia rose.

 

'Semiplena'

'Semiplena'

 

Alba Roses

The Latin word meaning white, these roses date back to ancient Rome. White or pale pink blooms contrasting against the blue-green of their foliage made these popular with the artists during the Renaissance.

 

'Hermosa'

'Hermosa'

 

 

China Roses

It was these roses, when brought over to Europe that resulted in the creation of the first Modern Roses. China Roses bloom repeatedly throughout the summer and fall months.

 

Old Tea Roses

Grown mainly in France, Old Tea roses were developed from cross breeding two tea-scented China Roses. Producing almost thornless stems the flowers of this rose can be found in white, light yellow or pink.

'Comte de Chambord'

'Comte de Chambord'

 

Portland Roses

Usually pink in colour, Portland Roses are a multi cross between China, Damask, Centifolia and Gallica roses. Very fragrant, compact, sturdy and long flowering they are great for mass plantings.

 

'Gipsy Boy'

'Gipsy Boy'

 

 

Bourbon Roses

Another repeat flowering rose, these were created from the China Rose. If deadheaded regularly they will flower throughout the summer and into the fall.

'Barronne Prevost'

'Barronne Prevost'

 

 

Hybrid Perpetual Roses

With fragrant flowers in red, pink or white Hybrid Perpetual roses were the dominant roses during Victorian times in England.

 

 

Noisette Roses

Noisettes are repeat-flowering climbing roses with clusters of fragrant blooms in creamy shades of pink, yellow, white and apricot.

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